How to write a winning journalism proposal

Have you ever toiled over a journalism grant application, only to learn that you did not receive the funding? Maybe you have been eying a journalism grant but have no idea how to pull together a successful proposal? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then you will want to join the CCIJ session on how to write a winning journalism grant application. During the session, CCIJ Editorial Director Yaffa Fredrick and award-winning independent journalist and CCIJ member Sonja Smith will walk you through the do’s and don’ts of grant writing, offer you insider tips and tricks to impress your reviewers and give you the tools necessary to pull together a detailed application quickly and painlessly.

When

Thursday, August 5, 2021
9:00-9:45 AM US Eastern Time /
3:00-3:45 PM Central Africa Time

Where

Virtual via Zoom
Link will be emailed prior to event

Cost

Free

Registration is open

About Sonja Smith

Sonja Smith is an award-winning journalist based in Namibia. A CCIJ member, she is a correspondent for the Associated Press and a part-time data wrangler for Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism. Smith has worked for various Namibian media publications including Confidante, Windhoek Observer and The Namibian. At the 2021 Editors Forum of Namibia Journalism Awards, she was awarded Journalist of the Year and her investigative story, “Grape crops bring in millions, farm workers live a harsh life,” won the Best Agriculture & Environmental Award.

About Yaffa Fredrick

Yaffa Fredrick is the editorial director for CCIJ. In addition, she is the political commentary editor for CNN Digital, where she oversees the commissioning and production of the site’s national news commentary. Fredrick previously edited major investigations into corruption in the South African lottery system, Nigerian officials’ misuse of international development funds and the Botswanan government’s unseemly ties to diamond miners. She has produced “Africa Investigates,” a podcast exploring both the investigations and the reporting that went into the production of the African portion of the Panama Papers. Fredrick was a part of the Panama Papers team that won the Pulitzer prize for explanatory reporting in 2017.